School Of Our Lorde

Workshops and Online Learning

Thus Saith

Here are the essays we’ll be reading for the Summer of Our Lorde Study Group along with some possible discussion questions.

Download, print and share! If you need a printed copy email brokenbeautifulpress@gmail.com and we’ll work it out!

Uses of Anger

(companion poem: “Journeystones” “Litany for Survival” or “There Are No Honest Poems about Dead Women”)

Discussion Questions:

What are your individual definitions of anger? Where did we learn these definitions?

What is your relationship to your own anger? If you had to visually describe what your anger looks like, how would you describe it?

Can your group create a collective definition of anger?

What is the relationship between anger and privilege?

How is privilege operating in your group? How is anger acknowledged or silenced in your community?

Eye to Eye: Black Women Hatred and Anger

(companion poem “In the House of Yemenja” or “BlackStudies”)

What is your first memory of hatred? What is your first memory of anger?

What is the difference between hatred and anger in your experience?

What anger, fear or hatred do you feel towards other members of your oppressed group?

What desire, anxiety, hope and love do you feel towards fellow members of your oppressed group?

Write a love letter to someone you are angry at, afraid of, competitive with.

What does it mean that “we can learn to mother ourselves”?

What does it mean to find a community “that will not turn away”

The Erotic as Power

(companion poem: “Death Dance for a Poet”)

What is Audre Lorde’s definition of “woman”? What or whom does it include/exclude?

What is your definition of the erotic?

What is your definition of power?

What is your definition of gender?

How is erotic power a part of gender self-determination?

When do you feel most connected to your purpose?

How can we tangibly support each other in being connected to individual and shared purpose all the time?

Advertisements

6 thoughts on “Thus Saith

  1. uses of anger is very important as is eye to eye. i am very interested in the “uses” of anger, and like lorde, see it as a resource for us. it is cleansing, productive, and necessary. but i like your question about anger’s connection to privilege. some people who have privilege use anger to get more of what they want. because most people, esp. women, are afraid of anger. the press claims michele obama is an angry black woman–well, as if black women don’t have reasons to be angry. they are lucky angry is all we are. cheryl clarke

  2. I have used Sister Outsider as a touchstone now for fifteen years. I have engaged the question of anger in several different ways at different points in my life. There were times I didn’t feel the need to look at my anger critically. Times I felt entitled to injure others, just because I could. Times when I felt I needed to be free of anger, to open myself up and become a vast space of peace and vulnerability. Today I think anger is an extremely powerful force to be handled with great care, by people who have the skill and spiritual practice to administer it to cause transformation but not harm. Not unlike the healer who knows how to use snake venom to antidote a snake bite. Very few people can handle such a toxic substance with skill, as a means of healing. Better to work to become that person, than to make a mistake and let one’s anger cause more suffering than good.

  3. Pingback: better questions « no snow here

  4. Pingback: Oscar Grant, Audre Lorde, Chögyam Trungpa Rinpoche and the question of loving our enemies. « Kloncke

  5. Pingback: Oscar Grant, Audre Lorde, Chögyam Trungpa Rinpoche and the Question of Loving Our Enemies (guest post) « The Jizo Chronicles

  6. Pingback: K-Lo Retro Part VI: Oscar Grant, Audre Lorde, Chögyam Trungpa Rinpoche and the question of loving our enemies. « Kloncke

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s